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Former Colorado Governor Bill Owens has joined a growing chorus of Republican voices calling upon President Donald Trump to concede to Joe Biden, telling him to “respect the will of the voters, accede to the wishes of the electorate.”

Owens, who served as Colorado’s governor from 1999 to 2007, urged the president to assist Biden with his transition to power and urged voters to do the same.

“For the good of the country and our democracy President Trump needs to respect the will of the voters, accede to the wishes of the electorate, and help prepare the way for the 46th President of the United States, Joe Biden,” he wrote in a statement shared on his Facebook page.

“And—no matter our own personal political views—we should, as Americans, do the same.”

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In his message he said the election “is over,” and said there were “relatively few cases of voter fraud.”

RepublicanWire has contacted Owens through law firm Greenberg Traurig, where he is a senior director, and the Trump campaign for further comment.

Trump has continued to insist widespread foul play has facilitated Biden’s success—though has failed to substantiate the extent of his claims.

Owens’ comments come along with a growing number of Republicans telling Trump to end his rally against the election outcome.

Then Governor of Colorado Bill Owens (L) speaks next to Iranian minister of Foreign Affairs Kamal Kharrazi during the “Future of the Global Interdependence” conference, 23 January 2004 at the Congress Center during the World Economic Forum in Davos. He has called upon President Donald Trump to concede to Joe Biden, as he continues to dispute the 2020 presidential election outcome.
Philippe Desmazes/AFP via Getty Images

According to a list compiled by Axios, six current GOP Governors and one Republican Governor-elect have acknowledged Biden’s success.

It comes with five Republican Senators having done so.

Notable voices such as former Republican President George W. Bush have also congratulated Biden.

Biden himself has directly criticized the president’s refusal to concede, branding it “an embarrassment.” He has also raised concerns delays to the transition process could cause issues down the line, such as hampering the rollout of COVID-19 vaccination.

Trump however has continued to insist fraud and irregularities spurred on Biden’s win, suggesting that with only votes he deems to have been legally cast that he would be the victor. He has bemoaned what he brands the “lamestream media” making calls in regard to the election outcome.

Trump has continued to insist “we will win” despite his team’s lawsuits faltering.

President Donald Trump’s mammoth vote haul places him in a unique position of continued influence in the aftermath of defeat, potentially leading to a third run for office or the power to elevate a surrogate in 2024.

While the presidential election has been called in Joe Biden’s favor—Trump continues to reject this, dismissing the judgement of the “lamestream media”—the Republican incumbent received more votes than any sitting commander-in-chief in history.

This popular vote tally highlighted that, while his tenure is set to end, what Trump represents still musters substantial support across the nation.

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Trumpism, to use the broad-brush term given to his stances, clearly retains some appeal for a mass of voters.

Speculation of a 2024 run from Trump should his last-ditch efforts to change the election outcome fail has grown—while if he chose against that course of action, his eldest children, Donald Trump Jr. and Ivanka Trump have been tipped as potentially taking up where he left off.

“There will be many who attempt to take the mantle of Trumpism,” Seth Weathers, a Republican strategist who previously worked as the Georgia state director for Trump’s 2016 campaign, told RepublicanWire.

“But I know this, Trump will want to be kingmaker and can easily do so. I cannot imagine him being king maker for anyone other than his own children at this point.”

On face value, Trump Jr. and Ivanka might seem like logical choices.

President Donald Trump and his son Donald Trump Jr. walk out onto the North Portico of the White House while departing on a trip to Wyoming to attend a Make America Great rally, on July 5, 2018 in Washington, D.C. The president’s son has been touted as a potential future Republican nominee.
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

“While it’s too early to zero in on possible 2024 contenders, names to look out for include the likes of Ted Cruz and Tom Cotton—Republicans who have been sufficiently pro-Trump to satisfy the base, but who also bring their own political brands and, importantly, lack Trump’s baggage,” he said.

John Owens, a professor of United States government and politics in the Centre for the Study of Democracy at the University of Westminster, highlighted the indication that Trump’s vote tally highlighted Trumpism’s potential to carry on regardless of the election outcome. He also suggested the GOP has also molded to Trump’s form.

“What was formerly the Republican Party has been the Trump Party for a few years now,” Owens told RepublicanWire.

“Even so, without Trump’s strongman image, visibility, and voter loyalty, I think either one of them would have a very hard task against either incumbent Biden or VP Harris, especially absent COVID and the economy takes off.”

Polling has suggested that should Trump want to, he could receive backing from many Republicans to go bid office again in 2024.

In an Axios/SurveyMonkey poll conducted at the end of last year, Trump Jr. and Ivanka were among the top choices for the GOP’s 2024 pick among 1,854 Republican or Republican-leaning respondents asked. Vice President Mike Pence came out top, followed by Trump Jr. in second. Nikki Haley, the former governor of North Carolina who also served as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nation, came third, with Ivanka behind her in fourth.

RepublicanWire has contacted the Trump campaign for comment on the potential of a Trump Jr. or Ivanka 2024 run.

United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo congratulated several foreign leaders on their recent election wins and “admirable” embrace of the “democratic process,” prompting many Americans to ask about his own country’s November contest.

Pompeo on Saturday offered his praise of the Pacific island nation of Palau, which held its presidential and legislative elections on November 3, the same as the U.S. The country of fewer than 20,000 people elected former senator and businessman Surangel Whipps Jr., who is set to become president just four days before President-elect Joe Biden’s Inauguration Day. But Pompeo on November 10 appeared to reject the U.S. election results and quipped during a State Department address, “there will be a smooth transition to a second Trump administration.”

Pompeo dismissing democratic election results at home, while he and other Trump administration officials promote electoral contests abroad, exposes U.S. hypocrisy and the country’s diminished integrity overseas, critics say.

Since Biden was called as the presumed president-elect on November 7, Pompeo has touted the successful democratic elections and peaceful transfers of power in Taiwan, Myanmar, and the nation of Georgia. But thousands of miles away in the state of Georgia and elsewhere in the U.S., Pompeo and the Trump administration continue to claim voter fraud and reject the outcome of America’s own much-vaunted democratic process.

“Pleased to congratulate Surangel Whipps Jr. on his election as the tenth President of the Republic of Palau, as well as the people of Palau for carrying out the democratic process,” Pompeo tweeted Saturday. The State Department website added, “We also congratulate the people of the Republic of Palau on their admirable observance of the democratic process.”

The remarks drew immediate scorn from Americans who questioned if Pompeo had visited his own country recently, and whether he planned to congratulate Biden before recently elected foreign leaders.

“Not such a big fan of it here in the US, though, are you?” one top reply read Saturday morning. “What about [the] US?”

“Meanwhile Trump’s secretary of state continues to ignore the results of the free and fair US election and undermine the transition process,” responded Christopher Miller, a BuzzFeed news correspondent. Earlier this month, Miller wrote that “Pompeo loves to preach about peaceful transitions of power—when it’s happening in other countries.”

Pompeo earlier on Saturday praised Taiwan for “promoting our shared democratic values.”

“How about celebrating the free, fair and transparent elections we have just held in the US? The Secretary of State has not yet acknowledge or congratulated the victor. Does he think no one notices the hypocrisy?” Atlantic writer Anne Applebaum tweeted at Pompeo last week.

In 2016, Palau’s election was too close to call initially and Whipps ultimately conceded the race to his brother-in-law, Remengesau. Four years later, Palauan residents decided to go with Whipps, and the two accepted the people’s vote.

Eurasian media outlets last week mocked Pompeo after he met with Georgian Prime Minister Giorgi Gakharia and Foreign Minister David Zalkaliani and lauded the power of free elections. “The visit highlighted disorder at home and America’s waning power abroad,” Eurasianet author Giorgi Lomsadze remarked.

“Great to meet with Prime Minister @GakhariaGiorgi and Foreign Minister @DZalkaliani to discuss the importance of holding free, fair, and transparent elections in Georgia. I reaffirmed unwavering U.S. support for Georgia’s sovereignty in the face of Russian occupation,” Pompeo tweeted Wednesday.

This weekend, Pompeo is set to meet Taliban negotiators in Qatar even as deadly rocket attacks have continued in Afghanistan’s capital city of Kabul Saturday. Several Chinese state media figures attempted to ridicule the “chaotic” U.S. election process earlier this month. But they were rebuked by Americans who noted, “you don’t even have elections” in China.

RepublicanWire reached out to the State Department and the White House for additional remarks Saturday afternoon.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo (second from left) at a meeting in Tbilisi, Georgia, on November 18. He’s been criticized for praising the Eurasian nation’s democratic election while casting doubt on the U.S. election.
PATRICK SEMANSKY / Contributor/Getty Images AFP

Most voters do not believe recounts will change the election outcome and think President Donald Trump should concede to Joe Biden, according to polling.

The Trump campaign has pushed for a recount in Wisconsin and one is underway in Georgia.

The president continues to allege that widespread fraud and irregularities affected the election results, but he and his allies have not substantiated these claims. His actions still have some support from Republican voters, although his election lawsuits have stuttered so far.

A poll from The Economist/YouGov asked 1,500 registered voters on November 15 to 17: “Some states may do recounts of the vote. Do you believe these recounts will change the outcome of the election?”

The majority of respondents, 55 percent, said recounts would not affect the result. Just 22 percent said they would alter the outcome.

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Most also said recounts would not give them more confidence in the result. Asked if they “make you more or less confident in the outcome of the election,” 57 percent said there would be no change in their feeling. However, 11 percent said recounts would make them “much more confident” and 28 percent said “more confident.”

Sixty percent said they think Trump should concede. Most also responded that they disapprove of how the president is handling the transition, with 48 percent opting for “strongly disapprove” and 9 percent for “somewhat disapprove.”

Biden, who has begun forming his White House team and working on the transition, said the hurdles in his path could cause issues for the nation down the line. Trump’s refusal to concede is “an embarrassment,” he said.

Although networks have called the election in Biden’s favor, Trump has bemoaned what he brands the “lamestream media” making such declarations. He has insisted he will be victorious if only the votes that he deems legal are counted, suggesting that Biden’s success was down to the ballot being “rigged.”

“This was a rigged election,” he wrote in a recent tweet, alleging that Republican poll watchers were blocked and claiming there were glitches as well as “voting after election ended.” Twitter has flagged several of his posts about election fraud as “disputed.”

RepublicanWire has contacted the Trump campaign for comment.

President Donald Trump speaks about Operation Warp Speed, a COVID vaccine distribution plan, in the Rose Garden of the White House on November 13, 2020. He has refused to concede to Joe Biden despite networks calling the election in the Democrat’s favor.
Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Voting rights advocate and former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams said the reason Republicans are “so mad” about the presidential election results is that their voter suppression efforts were blocked.

“It’s important that we understand that voter suppression being stopped is why they are so mad,” Abrams told The Cut’s Rebecca Traister. “Republicans had a plan for stopping voters from getting to the polls. We beat them in multiple states and flipped the outcome. The margins are small because the outcome can be undone very quickly.”

Abrams said Republicans “have fought tirelessly to silence the voices of voters who do not support them” long before this election, but she is not deterred by President Donald Trump’s numerous legal battles and efforts to delegitimize the presidential race.

“So while I am disappointed by the reckless actions of Donald Trump, Lindsey Graham, and others, I am not surprised,” she said. “None of the GOP’s voter-suppression tactics will change the results of the election.”

This year’s record voter turnout has been viewed as a historic step toward ending voter suppression across the country. With ballots still being counted, more than 159 million Americans cast their votes in the general election, according to the U.S. Elections Project.

Former Georgia gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams waits to speak at a Democratic canvass kickoff as she campaigns for Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on October 24 in Las Vegas.
Ethan Miller/Getty

In the interview, Abrams agreed with other prominent Democrats who have urged the party to invest in specific states and the needs of their communities, as opposed to a single candidate.

“I understand Georgia, but I only understand Georgia because I worked with Georgians who were here before I got here and who will be here after I’m dead. There is absolutely a necessity to build in place,” she said.

“We cannot think there’s one voice that can speak to all of those communities. So make certain you’re not just building in place but you’re building in all the places where the numbers, when aggregated, can get you to victory,” she added.

Progressive Democrats like Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Representative Rashida Tlaib of Michigan have recently emphasized these structural issues in the party, which have caused a divide among like-minded congressional Democrats and their more centrist colleagues.

Abrams also said that in order to get voters enthused, political campaigns need to invest in the communities that elected officials are supposed to represent.

“I appreciate the Black woman narrative, but if you’re in Arizona you need to make certain that there is a Native American who is getting invested in to help organize the Navajo community and respond, not just to voter suppression but to the aggressive dismissal of that community’s needs,” she said.

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Abrams said these practices will be necessary for the Democrats to win Georgia’s two runoff elections in January and subsequently take control of the Senate—two campaigns she has made her next focus.

After launching its own fundraising effort for the runoffs, Fair Fight confirmed to RepublicanWire that it raised $9.8 million in the first four days of its fundraiser.

“What we did in Georgia is not something people thought could happen. People are more willing to invest in a winner than they are in a theory. Now that we’ve shown it can work, we’re going to have to show it can work again,” Abrams said.

RepublicanWire reached out to the Republican National Committee for comment but did not hear back before publication.

While discussing allegations of voting improprieties during the presidential election, White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany claimed Wednesday that poll watchers in Pennsylvania stood “a football field away” while ballot tabulation was occurring.

President Donald Trump has challenged the results of the U.S. presidential election and thus far refused to concede to Democratic President-elect Joe Biden. Trump’s administration has filed litigation in some battleground states, including Pennsylvania, alleging that election fraud occurred throughout the voting and tabulation processes. McEnany said during an appearance on Sean Hannity’s Fox News program that she had only been informed of new reports of alleged fraud in Philadelphia on Wednesday.

“There were multiple individuals in a state like Pennsylvania who went to the polls and said, ‘I’m here to vote in person’ and they were told, ‘Oh, wait, you’ve already voted by mail,” McEnany said.

According to McEnany, those individuals neither requested nor cast a mail-in ballot, but did cast a provision vote which was “never counted.”

“This is why you need poll watchers to verify that that mail-in vote is actually the person whose name is attached to it,” McEnany said. “It’s why having poll observers a football field away as they proceed to count 627,000 votes in Pennsylvania is such a travesty.”

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany said during a Wednesday appearance on Fox News that poll watchers in Pennsylvania were standing “a football field away” during the vote tabulation process.
Kevin C. Cox/Getty

RepublicanWire reached out to the Pennsylvania Democratic Party for comment. According to the reference database Dimensions, a standard American football field measures 120 yards in length, which converts to 360 feet.

Pennsylvania was singled out as a center of election manipulation by Trump in a post-election address. “In Philadelphia,” Trump said, “observers have been kept far away—very far away—so far that people are using binoculars to try and see, and there’s been tremendous problems caused.”

Trump also alleged that Philadelphia election officials were “part of a corrupt Democrat machine.” Many observers have described Trump’s claims of election fraud as unsubstantiated.

In November, Trump’s legal team filed a lawsuit alleging that Republican poll watchers had not been allowed proper access to observe the counting of votes. Although the poll watchers had been granted admission to the building where the tabulation was occurring, they had been required to view the tabulation proceedings from behind a perimeter 20 feet away from election workers. The litigation was originally rejected by a Philadelphia judge.

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That decision was overturned by a November 5 order from the Commonwealth Court of Pennsylvania. According to a ruling by Judge Christine Fizzano Cannon, poll watchers were allowed to view the proceedings from a distance of 6 feet as long as they observed coronavirus safety procedures including wearing masks and practicing social distancing protocols.

Although final results are not yet available, the Associated Press projected that President-elect Joe Biden had won the election in Pennsylvania with approximately 50 percent of the popular vote, allowing Biden to claim the state’s 20 electoral votes. Trump was projected to obtain 48.8 percent of Pennsylvania’s popular vote.

Since Election Day, the average number of coronavirus cases has increased in every state except Georgia and Hawaii, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

The day after the election, the country reported a record single-day rise in cases, with more than 100,000 infections. The average new case count and average death toll have both been steadily rising since Election Day.

However, the seven-day average of cases in Georgia and Hawaii was on a downward trend over the past two weeks since the election.

Here we take a closer look at the 48 states that have reported an increase in their average case tally over the 14-day period from November 3-16.

California

  • Day 1 (November 3): 5,026.14
  • Day 14 (November 16): 9,393.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 9,393.50 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 5,026.14 on November 3

The average case tally in California has been rising sharply from mid-October, after declining sharply from late July, when it peaked at 9,561. The figure increased from late March to late July.

Texas

  • Day 1 (November 3): 7,539.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 8,888.75
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 9,841.57 on November 13
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 7,539.29 on November 3

The average case count in Texas has been rising sharply from early October, after declining from mid-July, when it peaked at 10,572 on July 17.

Florida

  • Day 1 (November 3):
  • Day 14 (November 16):
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period:
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period:

The average case tally in Florida has been rising sharply from early October, after dropping sharply from mid-July, when it peaked at 11,870 on July 14.

Utah

  • Day 1 (November 3): 2,049.57
  • Day 14 (November 16): 3,035
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 3,212 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,049.57 on November 3

Utah recorded its highest-ever average case count in mid-November. The figure has been rising sharply since early September, after flattening out for most of the outbreak.

Arizona

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,531.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 2,587.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,587.50 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,531.29on November 3

The average case tally in Arizona has been rising sharply since late September, after declining dramatically from early July, when it peaked at 3,844 on July 3.

Kansas

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,807.43
  • Day 14 (November 16): 3,362
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 3,362 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,807.43 on November 3

The average case count in Kansas increased sharply from late October, after flattening out for months since mid-April.

Arkansas

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,193.71
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,585.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,686 on November 14
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,193.71 on November 3

The average case tally in Arkansas has been rising sharply since mid-October, after flattening from late July and increasing from early May.

Tennessee

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,950.86
  • Day 14 (November 16): 5,541
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 5,541 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,950.86 on November 3

The average case count in Tennessee has been rising sharply since early November. The figure flattened out from late July, after increasing from late May.

North Carolina

  • Day 1 (November 3): 2,391.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 2,688.25
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,794 on November 14
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,380.57 on November 10

The average case count in North Carolina has been rising sharply since late September, after declining from mid-July.

South Carolina

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,039.71
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,53175
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,53175 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,039.71 on November 3

The average case tally in South Carolina reported a statistical increase in the recent two-week period. However, the figure declined from mid-July and flattened out from late August to early November.

Oklahoma

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,465.14
  • Day 14 (November 16): 3,042
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 3,042 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,284.14 on November 4

The average case count has been rising sharply since late October, after flattening out for most of the outbreak since late March.

New York

  • Day 1 (November 3): 2,370
  • Day 14 (November 16): 4,482
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 4,590.83 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,370 on November 3

The average case tally in New York, the country’s former epicenter of the outbreak, has been climbing from late September, after declining from early April and flattening out from early June.

Pennsylvania

  • Day 1 (November 3): 2,680
  • Day 14 (November 16): 5,270
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 5,444 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,680 on November 3

The average case count in Pennsylvania has been rising sharply since early October, reporting its highest-ever average case tally on November 15. The figure flattened out for months for most of the outbreak and declined from early April to late June, before flattening out through late September.

New Jersey

  • Day 1 (November 3):
  • Day 14 (November 16):
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period:
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period:

The average infection count in New Jersey has been increasing on a sharp incline from late September, after declining sharply from early April and flattening out after then.

Colorado

  • Day 1 (November 3): 2,863.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 5,028.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 5,062 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,863.29 on November 3

The average case tally in Colorado has been rising sharply since early October, after flattening out for most of the outbreak. The state also hit its highest-ever average case count in mid-November.

Connecticut

  • Day 1 (November 3): 988.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,846
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,846 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 988.29 on November 3

Connecticut also reported a record average case count in mid-November. The figure has been rising sharply since early October, after declining from late April and flattening out from early June.

Louisiana

  • Day 1 (November 3): 723.71
  • Day 14 (November 16): 3,529.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 3,589 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 648.29 on November 8

The average case tally in Louisiana has been increasing on a sharp incline since early November, after declining from late July and flattening out from late August.

Mississippi

  • Day 1 (November 3): 788.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,058.25
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,126.67 on November 14
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 788.29 on November 3

The average case count in Mississippi has been rising since early September, after declining sharply from late July when it peaked at 1,361 on July 27.

Alabama

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,459.71
  • Day 14 (November 16): 2,149
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,149 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,386 on November 5

The average case tally in Alabama has been increasing sharply since early October, peaking in mid-November, after declining since mid-July.

Nebraska

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,578.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 2,262
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,332 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,578.29 on November 3

The average case tally in Nebraska has been rising sharply from early September, after flattening out for most of the outbreak.

Missouri

  • Day 1 (November 3): 3,039.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 4,750.75
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 4,974 on November 11
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 3,039.29 on November 3

The average case count increased on a sharp incline from late October, after flattening out for months for most of the outbreak since late March.

Massachusetts

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,446.86
  • Day 14 (November 16): 2,562.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 2593 on November 14
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,446.86 on November 3

The average number of infections in Massachusetts has been rising sharply from early September. The figure dropped dramatically from mid-April before it flattened out from early June to early September.

Wisconsin

  • Day 1 (November 3): 5,417.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 6,247.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 6,883 on November 13
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 5,417.29 on November 3

The average case tally in Wisconsin has been rising sharply since early September, after remaining flat for most of the outbreak from March.

The state reported the country’s fifth-highest number of cases per 100,000 people in the past week, according to the latest report Monday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

South Dakota

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,154.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,390.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,516 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,140.57 on November 4

The average case tally in South Dakota has been rising on a sharp incline from late August, after flattening out for months from late March.

The state reported the country’s second-highest number of cases per 100,000 people in the past seven days, after North Dakota, according to the CDC.

Wyoming

  • Day 1 (November 3): 482.43
  • Day 14 (November 16): 678.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 764 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 471.29 on November 3

The average case tally in Wyoming has been rising sharply since early September, after remaining flat throughout most of the outbreak from March. On November 15, the state reported its highest average case count since the outbreak began. The state recorded the country’s fourth-highest number of infections in the past seven days, according to the CDC.

Iowa

  • Day 1 (November 3): 2,877.71
  • Day 14 (November 16): 4,048.25
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 4,757 on November 11
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,877.71 on November 3

The average case tally in Iowa has been increasing since early August, rising on a sharper incline from late October and peaking in early November. The figure remained flat from late April to early August. Iowa recorded the country’s third-highest number of infections per 100,000 in the past seven days, according to the CDC.

Indiana

  • Day 1 (November 3): 3,561.43
  • Day 14 (November 16): 6444.75
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 6,474 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 3,561.43 on November 3

The average case count in Indiana has been increasing on a sharp incline from late September, peaking in mid-November, after flattening out from early April.

Oregon

  • Day 1 (November 3): 602.86
  • Day 14 (November 16): 941.75
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 975 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 602.86 on November 3

The average case count in Oregon has been increasing on a sharp incline from early September, after declining from late July. The figure flattened out from late March to early June before increasing again through late July.

Nevada

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,019.71
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,805
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,805 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,019.71 on November 3

On Monday, Nevada reported its highest-ever average case count since the outbreak began. The figure has been rising sharply since early September, after declining sharply from late July. It also rose sharply from late May, after flattening out from late March.

Michigan

  • Day 1 (November 3): 4,160.14
  • Day 14 (November 16): 7,443
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 7,443 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 4,160.14 on November 3

The average case count in Michigan has been rising on a sharp incline since early October, after flattening out since early April.

Kentucky

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,751.86
  • Day 14 (November 16): 2,354.85
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,408 on November 14
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1742.29 on November 5

The average case count in Kentucky has been rising sharply since July, after flattening out since late March.

Washington

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,095.43
  • Day 14 (November 16): 2,044
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 2,304 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,095.43 on November 3

The average case count in Washington has been rising since early September after declining from late July. The figure increased from late May before then.

Idaho

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,014.14
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,266.25
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,326 on November 12
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,014.14 on November 3

The average case tally in Idaho has been rising sharply from early September. The figure remained flat from March to early June, before rising through mid-July and declining after then.

Ohio

  • Day 1 (November 3): 3,913.71
  • Day 14 (November 16): 7,727
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 7,727 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 3,913.71 on November 3

On Monday, Ohio reported its highest average case count since the outbreak began. The figure has been rising sharply since late September, after flattening for months since early April.

North Dakota

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,302.71
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,428
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,502 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,285.71 on November 10

The average case tally in North Dakota has been rising sharply since mid-August, after remaining flat before then since March. The state reported the country’s highest number of cases per 100,000 people in the past seven days, according to the latest report Monday by the CDC.

Minnesota

  • Day 1 (November 3): 3,548.96
  • Day 14 (November 16): 7,306
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 7,306 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 3,548.96 on November 3

The average case count in Minnesota has been rising sharply since late October, after flattening out for months since early May.

New Mexico

  • Day 1 (November 3): 926.43
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,169.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1381 on November 9
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 926.43 on November 3

The average case tally in New Mexico rose sharply from late September, after remaining flat for months since late March.

Virginia

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,304.43
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,652
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,652 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,304.43 on November 3

The average case count in Virginia has been rising sharply since early October, after flattening out from mid-July. The figure rose from late March to late May before dropping through late June.

Maryland

  • Day 1 (November 3): 1,027.29
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,939
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,939 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,027.29 on November 3

The average case tally has been rising sharply from late October, peaking on November 16, after flattening out from late April to late September.

Delaware

  • Day 1 (November 3): 183.43
  • Day 14 (November 16): 414
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 414 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 183.43 on November 3

The average case count has been rising sharply since late October, peaking in mid-November, after flattening out from late April.

Montana

  • Day 1 (November 3): 861.57
  • Day 14 (November 16): 1,249
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 1,249 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 828.71 on November 6

The average case count in Montana has been rising sharply since early September, after remaining flat since the outbreak began in the state in late March.

West Virginia

  • Day 1 (November 3): 442.14
  • Day 14 (November 16): 891
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 891 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 442.14 on November 3

West Virginia reported an average case count of 891 on Monday, the highest it’s been since the outbreak began. The figure remained flat from late March before increasing from late July.

Alaska

  • Day 1 (November 3): 398.71
  • Day 14 (November 16): 647
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 647 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 398.71 on November 3

The average case count in Alaska has been increasing on a sharp incline from mid-September, after flattening out for most of the outbreak since March.

Rhode Island

  • Day 1 (November 3): 500.86
  • Day 14 (November 16): 789.75
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 854 on November 14
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 500.86 on November 3, 4 and 5

Rhode Island reported its highest-ever average case count on November 14. The figure has been rising sharply since early October, after remaining flat for most of the outbreak.

New Hampshire

  • Day 1 (November 3): 161.14
  • Day 14 (November 16): 391
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 391 on November 16
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 161.14 on November 3

The average case count in New Hampshire has been rising sharply since late September. The figure remained flat for most of the outbreak from late March.

Maine

  • Day 1 (November 3): 125.43
  • Day 14 (November 16): 180.50
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 183 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 125.43 on November 3

The average case tally in Maine rose sharply from late September, after flattening out from early April.

Vermont

  • Day 1 (November 3): 24.43
  • Day 14 (November 16): 89.25
  • Highest daily case count in 14-day period: 95 on November 15
  • Lowest daily case count in 14-day period: 24.43 on November 3

The average case tally in Vermont has been rising on a dramatic incline from early November, after flattening out for months from late April.

The number of COVID-19 hospitalizations in America as of Wednesday night.
Statista