Tag

pete buttigieg

Browsing

(RepublicanWire.org) – Secretary of Transportation Pete Buttigieg joined Joy Behar, Sara Haines, and Ana Navarro on ‘The View” this week to talk about Florida’s new “Parental Rights in Education” law — which he absurdly claimed “will kill kids” — before going on to add inflation and high gas prices to his list of Florida Governor Ron DeSantis’ faults.

“Your husband, Chasten, is a teacher and he’s been a vocal critic of what’s going on in my state of Florida when the, with the so-called ‘don’t say gay’ law, which he says will kill kids. Do you agree?” Navarro asked Buttigieg.

“Yeah, he’s right,” Buttigieg answered. “And I think every law to be judged for the effect it’s going to have on real people in real life, and I get the political reasons why they’re doing this. By the way, some of those political reasons (laughs), they don’t have a plan on anything else, right? I mean, they don’t have a plan on dealing with inflation or dealing with gas prices or dealing with the issues.”

Buttigieg’s bizarre claims immediately drew harsh criticism on Twitter.

(RepublicanWire.org) – Lower speed limits and more bike lanes may soon be coming to your community, courtesy of Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg.

Buttigieg told the Associated Press Thursday that the Biden administration is preparing to roll out a new “safe system” plan designed to decrease traffic fatalities nationwide. The plan comes as new federal data will be released this week showing traffic fatalities significantly increased in the third quarter of 2021 compared to the same period in 2020. The AP reported that the half-year traffic death total for 2020 was 20,160, the highest half-year figure since 2006.

“It doesn’t look good, and I continue to be extremely concerned about the trend,” Buttigieg said.

“Somehow it has become over the years and decades as normal, sort of the cost of doing business,” he added. ““Even through a pandemic that led to considerably less driving, we continue to see more danger on our roads.”

According to the Department of Transportation, almost 95% of transportation deaths in the U.S. occur on its streets, roads, and highways.

“We cannot tolerate the continuing crisis of roadway deaths in America. These deaths are preventable, and that’s why we’re launching the National Roadway Safety Strategy today – a bold, comprehensive plan, with significant new funding from President Biden’s Bipartisan Infrastructure Law,” Buttigieg said in a statement.

The transportation secretary’s plan to reach “zero roadway fatalities” is to spend $5 billion in grants and issue guidance encouraging cities to lower speed limits, adopt safer road design by creating dedicated bike and bus lanes, and improve street lighting and crosswalks.

Funding for the grants was included in the $1.2 trillion infrastructure law signed by President Joe Biden, which also included $4 billion in funding for the Highway Safety Improvement Program, DOT said.

The agency added that roadway safety is “inextricably linked with the Biden-Harris Administration’s equity and climate goals,” observing that traffic fatalities “disproportionately affect communities of color, people living in rural areas, people with disabilities, and older adults.”

Other components of the plan include pilot programs to study and promote increased use of traffic cameras; updates to the federal manual that sets the requirements for U.S. street markings and design; regulations mandating automatic emergency braking in all new passenger vehicles; new standards for car safety performance; and enforcing requirements from the infrastructure law for automakers to install anti-drunken driving technology in motor vehicles.

At a press conference announcing the strategy, Buttigieg cited Hoboken, New Jersey as an example of a U.S. city that has achieved zero traffic fatalities by making roadway improvements like curb extensions and better-timed traffic lights.

“Today we commit that our goal is this: zero. Our goal is zero deaths,” Buttigieg said.

“The decision to commit to that goal in a serious way at a national level changes the way cities and towns design roads, changes the way companies build cars, changes the way people drive.”

Whether a person is gay or not doesn’t matter. As you probably noticed during the past two election cycles, President Trump managed to amass a lot of support in the LGBTQ community. Let’s be clear: that support was higher for Democrats, especially Barack Obama when he was running for re-election in 2012 and announced for purely political purposes that he supports same-sex marriage. But many forget that Obama’s stance shifed suddenly when he needed the poll numbers. Now, a new book reveals that his stance hasn’t shifted all that much — at least behind the scenes.

“I believe marriage is between a man and a woman. I am not in favor of gay marriage.” This quote isn’t from Pat Robertson. It’s not from Lindsey Graham. It’s not from any conservative. These words were spoken by Barack Obama in 2008. In 1996, however, when asked about his stance on gay marriage by a Chicago-area gay newspaper, he said, “I favor legalizing same-sex marriages, and would fight efforts to prohibit such marriages.” In a later questionnaire for the same newspaper, he said “Undecided” in 1998. Later, he said he favored civil unions, but not marriage. “I am a fierce supporter of domestic-partnership and civil-union laws. I am not a supporter of gay marriage…” he said in 2004 before settling back on “I believe marriage is between a man and a woman,” which he repeated during an appearance on MTV. As you can see, Obama’s belief on the subject shifts seemingly constantly — and his loyalty to the gay community with it.

Now, having apparently settled on “gay marriage is fine” for political purposes, one might expect Obama to support a gay man for President. After all, if he’s good enough to get married, he’s good enough to be President, right? Not according to Obama. “Lucky: How Joe Biden Barely Won the Presidency,” by the Hill’s Amie Parnes and NBC’s Jonathan Allen, show that Obama was still the same old homophobic bigot he’s always been in 2019.

During a meeting with elite black donors, Obama shared his thoughts on Pete Buttigieg’s presidential prospects. Via The Hill:

“He’s thirty-eight,” Obama said, pausing for dramatic effect, “but he looks thirty.” The audience laughed. Obama was on a roll, using the tone of light ridicule he some-times pointed at himself— “ big ears” and “a funny name,” he’d said so many times before. Now, it was directed at Buttigieg. “He’s the mayor of a small town,” the former president continued. “He’s gay,” Obama said, “and he’s short.” More laughter.

Only months earlier, Buttigieg had sat in Obama’s postpresidential office in Washington seeking counsel on how to maintain equanimity in the face of homophobia on the campaign trail. Now, behind his back, Obama was riffing on him to some of the wealthiest Black men in America at a time when Buttigieg had been dubbed “Mayo Pete” by critics who believed he couldn’t connect with African American voters.

That’s right. The President liberals credit with gay marriage said that Buttigieg is too gay to be President. And he did so after the man came to him for advice in handling the very brand of homophobia Obama exhibited in that speech.

No matter your views on homosexuality, one thing is certain. Obama built much of his reputation on his alleged support for the community. He did this despite a mountain of evidence that he was not genuine. After people gave him the benefit of the doubt, he betrayed that community broadly and one member of it specifically — a man who sought his guidance and trusted him. That’s the real Barack Obama.