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After the incident at the Capitol on January 6, the media — and social media companies — rushed to throw blame at every conservative they could. President Trump, despite his attempts to calm the crowd. Conservatives in general, despite the peaceful nature of the protest. In the rush to demonize anyone to the Right of Nancy Pelosi, conservative social media network Parler was removed from Apple and Android app stores. Then, Amazon killed its web hosting. Eventually, Parler found a new hosting service that doesn’t hate free speech. But now, he company has won a major victory: it’s back on iPhone app stores.

Noting the company’s commitment to constantly improve its methods of detecting and moderating hate speech — which has always been against Parler’s rules — Apple sent a letter to Congress on Monday announcing that the social media service would be allowed to return. CNN reports:

The letter — addressed to Sen. Mike Lee and Rep. Ken Buck and obtained by CNN — explained that since the app was removed from Apple’s platform in January for violations of its policies, Parler “has proposed updates to its app and the app’s content moderation practices.”On April 14, Apple’s app review team told Parler that its proposed changes were sufficient, the letter continued. Now, all Parler needs to do is to flip the switch.

“Apple anticipates that the updated Parler app will become available immediately upon Parler releasing it,” Apple’s letter said.Apple declined to comment. Parler didn’t immediately respond to request for comment.

When Apple removed Parler from the app store, it was for things that exist on other social media platforms — “hate speech,” glorification of violence, and more. Parler has always made an effort to moderate these things, but the newness of the platform allowed the Left to take advantage of growing pains to cut off access.

We can expect the Left to throw tantrums — but now that the media-stoked furor has died down, we are regaining some sense of sensibility.

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas has warned that social media companies like Facebook and Twitter’s decisions to censor conservative speech may have dire consequences. Recently, Thomas blasted Section 240 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects these companies from the consequences of their actions for many things, including censorship.

NPR reports that Thomas is incensed that Twitter and other companies abused their platforms to unfairly ban President Trump and others simply for exercising their First Amendment rights:

…Thomas took broad aim at social media networks, attacking Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, the landmark law that protects technology companies from lawsuits and also provides platforms wide latitude in patrolling speech on their sites.

To Thomas, Twitter’s ban of Trump exposed the potential abuses of this legal protection, noting how “applying old doctrines to new digital platforms is rarely straightforward.”

Thomas went on: “As Twitter made clear, the right to cut off speech lies most powerfully in the hands of private digital platforms. The extent to which that power matters for purposes of the First Amendment and the extent to which that power could lawfully be modified raise interesting and important questions,” Thomas wrote.

Big Tech companies Facebook and Google, Thomas pointed out, have vast and largely unchecked control over online marketplaces.

“It changes nothing that these platforms are not the sole means for distributing speech or information. A person always could choose to avoid the toll bridge or train and instead swim the Charles River or hike the Oregon Trail,” Thomas says. “But in assessing whether a company exercises substantial market power, what matters is whether the alternatives are comparable. For many of today’s digital platforms, nothing is.”

Thomas feels that social media companies are “sufficiently akin” to a public utility like a phone company, and should be  “regulated in this manner” rather than be given unchecked censorship power.

Could the Supreme Court step up and force social media companies to be fair under the First Amendment? Only time will tell — but Thomas clearly wants to.